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How To Clean Quartz Countertops

How To Clean Quartz Countertops

Engineered quartz countertops rival the sophistication, design, and timeless appeal of real stone, minus the high maintenance. If you’re lucky enough to have this luxurious material in your kitchen, read on for our complete guide to keeping it clean.

Quartz. Quartzite. The names sound alike. But although both of these popular countertop materials are derived from the same mineral, and both achieve a similar aesthetic when installed, they are not the same.

Quartzite is formed when quartz-rich sandstone is exposed to high heat and pressure over time as a result of natural processes. It’s found all over the world and in a variety of patterns and colors. Engineered quartz, in contrast, is factory-produced by combining quartz with resins, binding agents, and occasionally pigments.

Thanks to the latest leaps in the aesthetics of man-made stone, today’s quartz genuinely reflects nature’s splendor, but with an important upgrade: unlike natural quartzite, which must be sealed on a regular basis (twice a year, according to some experts), quartz does not require any sealing in order to resist stains, making it a very popular compromise. In fact, resin binders render quartz countertops, making the material impervious to mold, mildew, and stain- and odor-causing bacteria.

Whether yours are quartzite or quartz, you can maintain the surface using the same techniques.

SUMMARY OF QUARTZ COUNTERTOP CARE

  • Clean fresh spills with dish soap and a soft cloth, e.g., microfiber.
  • Use glass or surface cleaner, along with a nonabrasive sponge, to remove stains.

ROUTINE CLEANING

Though quartz will resist permanent staining when exposed to liquids like wine, vinegar, tea, lemon juice, and soda, or fruits and vegetables, it’s important to wipe up spills immediately—before they have a chance to dry. Take care of fresh messes with mild dishwashing detergent and a soft cloth.

For dried spills or heavy stains, your best bet is a glass or surface cleaner, a nonabrasive sponge (sponges designed for nonstick pans are safe and effective), and a little elbow grease. Keep a plastic putty knife handy to gently scrape off gum, food, nail polish, paint, or other messes that harden as they dry.

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